Copyright 2018 Dickinson Woodworks. Design by Gibson Blanc

Tel: 07970 686673

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About/Team

Dickinson Woodworks started in 1990 when Charles Dickinson left a teaching career to pursue his lifelong passion for working with wood. Charles learnt woodwork from his father, who in turn had been taught by his uncle Frank Dickinson, a pioneer of the Arts and Crafts movement in the early 20th Century.

Charles began the business in a small shed in Clapham. Indoor space was limited, so they worked outdoors in the yard, using small tools, pretty much all year round.

Charles' son Sam Dickinson joined the business a few years later after completing his Architectural degree.

With an eye for design and an empirical approach, Sam’s style is well-suited to problem solving; he often tests furniture mock-ups at home.

In 1996 Dickinson Woodworks moved to a larger workshop in Clapham North, and upgraded their machinery, enabling them to take on more ambitious projects. Other tenants there were mainly craftspeople and designers who often became clients or collaborators to get their ideas into practice. Charles and Sam also developed a network of subcontractors for specialist trades.

The business expanded into newly furbished modern premises in Croydon in 2004 when Stefan Reichenbach moved from Germany with his family to join as a partner.

Stefan undertook a three-year apprenticeship under German artisan cabinet maker Konrad Mauersberger. He learnt the importance of fully mastering processes by hand before using machines, giving an understanding of what he was trying to achieve, and thus to appreciate the help from the machine.

Stefan also wanted a design education, so he then took a four-year degree in furniture design. Stefan believes that thinking is aided by doing, and that designing and making are interdependent and closely intertwined.

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Dickinson Woodworks started in 1990 when Charles Dickinson left a teaching career to pursue his lifelong passion for working with wood. Charles learnt woodwork from his father, who in turn had been taught by his uncle Frank Dickinson, a pioneer of the Arts and Crafts movement in the early 20th Century.

Charles began the business in a small shed in Clapham. Indoor space was limited, so they worked outdoors in the yard, using small tools, pretty much all year round.

Charles' son Sam Dickinson joined the business a few years later after completing his Architectural degree.

With an eye for design and an empirical approach, Sam’s style is well-suited to problem solving; he often tests furniture mock-ups at home.

In 1996 Dickinson Woodworks moved to a larger workshop in Clapham North, and upgraded their machinery, enabling them to take on more ambitious projects. Other tenants there were mainly craftspeople and designers who often became clients or collaborators to get their ideas into practice. Charles and Sam also developed a network of subcontractors for specialist trades.

The business expanded into newly furbished modern premises in Croydon in 2004 when Stefan Reichenbach moved from Germany with his family to join as a partner.

Stefan undertook a three-year apprenticeship under German artisan cabinet maker Konrad Mauersberger. He learnt the importance of fully mastering processes by hand before using machines, giving an understanding of what he was trying to achieve, and thus to appreciate the help from the machine.

Stefan also wanted a design education, so he then took a four-year degree in furniture design. Stefan believes that thinking is aided by doing, and that designing and making are interdependent and closely intertwined.

Tel: 07970 686673

Dickinson Woodworks started in 1990 when Charles Dickinson left a teaching career to pursue his lifelong passion for working with wood. Charles learnt woodwork from his father, who in turn had been taught by his uncle Frank Dickinson, a pioneer of the Arts and Crafts movement in the early 20th Century.

Charles began the business in a small shed in Clapham. Indoor space was limited, so they worked outdoors in the yard, using small tools, pretty much all year round.

Charles' son Sam Dickinson joined the business a few years later after completing his Architectural degree.

With an eye for design and an empirical approach, Sam’s style is well-suited to problem solving; he often tests furniture mock-ups at home.

In 1996 Dickinson Woodworks moved to a larger workshop in Clapham North, and upgraded their machinery, enabling them to take on more ambitious projects. Other tenants there were mainly craftspeople and designers who often became clients or collaborators to get their ideas into practice. Charles and Sam also developed a network of subcontractors for specialist trades.

The business expanded into newly furbished modern premises in Croydon in 2004 when Stefan Reichenbach moved from Germany with his family to join as a partner.

Stefan undertook a three-year apprenticeship under German artisan cabinet maker Konrad Mauersberger. He learnt the importance of fully mastering processes by hand before using machines, giving an understanding of what he was trying to achieve, and thus to appreciate the help from the machine.

Stefan also wanted a design education, so he then took a four-year degree in furniture design. Stefan believes that thinking is aided by doing, and that designing and making are interdependent and closely intertwined.

Tel: 07970 686673

Dickinson Woodworks started in 1990 when Charles Dickinson left a teaching career to pursue his lifelong passion for working with wood. Charles learnt woodwork from his father, who in turn had been taught by his uncle Frank Dickinson, a pioneer of the Arts and Crafts movement in the early 20th Century.

Charles began the business in a small shed in Clapham. Indoor space was limited, so they worked outdoors in the yard, using small tools, pretty much all year round.

Charles' son Sam Dickinson joined the business a few years later after completing his Architectural degree.

With an eye for design and an empirical approach, Sam’s style is well-suited to problem solving; he often tests furniture mock-ups at home.

In 1996 Dickinson Woodworks moved to a larger workshop in Clapham North, and upgraded their machinery, enabling them to take on more ambitious projects. Other tenants there were mainly craftspeople and designers who often became clients or collaborators to get their ideas into practice. Charles and Sam also developed a network of subcontractors for specialist trades.

The business expanded into newly furbished modern premises in Croydon in 2004 when Stefan Reichenbach moved from Germany with his family to join as a partner.

Stefan undertook a three-year apprenticeship under German artisan cabinet maker Konrad Mauersberger. He learnt the importance of fully mastering processes by hand before using machines, giving an understanding of what he was trying to achieve, and thus to appreciate the help from the machine.

Stefan also wanted a design education, so he then took a four-year degree in furniture design. Stefan believes that thinking is aided by doing, and that designing and making are interdependent and closely intertwined.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About/Team

Tel: 07970 686673

Dickinson Woodworks started in 1990 when Charles Dickinson left a teaching career to pursue his lifelong passion for working with wood. Charles learnt woodwork from his father, who in turn had been taught by his uncle Frank Dickinson, a pioneer of the Arts and Crafts movement in the early 20th Century.

Charles began the business in a small shed in Clapham. Indoor space was limited, so they worked outdoors in the yard, using small tools, pretty much all year round.

Charles' son Sam Dickinson joined the business a few years later after completing his Architectural degree.

With an eye for design and an empirical approach, Sam’s style is well-suited to problem solving; he often tests furniture mock-ups at home.

In 1996 Dickinson Woodworks moved to a larger workshop in Clapham North, and upgraded their machinery, enabling them to take on more ambitious projects. Other tenants there were mainly craftspeople and designers who often became clients or collaborators to get their ideas into practice. Charles and Sam also developed a network of subcontractors for specialist trades.

The business expanded into newly furbished modern premises in Croydon in 2004 when Stefan Reichenbach moved from Germany with his family to join as a partner.

Stefan undertook a three-year apprenticeship under German artisan cabinet maker Konrad Mauersberger. He learnt the importance of fully mastering processes by hand before using machines, giving an understanding of what he was trying to achieve, and thus to appreciate the help from the machine.

Stefan also wanted a design education, so he then took a four-year degree in furniture design. Stefan believes that thinking is aided by doing, and that designing and making are interdependent and closely intertwined.
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Copyright 2018 Dickinson Woodworks.

Design by Gibson Blanc